Fans of Italian crime/cop fare haven’t had much to look forward to lately but that changes at the end of July thanks to RaroVideo’s U.S. division: they will be releasing the cult fave Live Like A Cop, Die Like A Man on July 26th.  This was a rare venture into the crime film for Ruggero Deodato, director of the infamous Cannibal Holocaust, and stars Euro-cult regular Ray Lovelock.  This disc will boast a new HD transfer plus supplements.  Read on for all the Neapolitan crime-smashing details…

LIVE LIKE A COP, DIE LIKE A MAN LIVES UP TO ITS REPUTATION

AS ONE OF THE MOST VIOLENT FILMS EVER MADE

BOTH Available on DVD JULY 26 FROM RAROVIDEO U.S.

LOS ANGELES (June 23, 2011) – Referenced in Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill Vol. 2, Live Like a Cop, Die Like a Man (1976) is one of the most violent, censored and unconventional Italian style detective films of its time. The credit goes to both the director Ruggero Deodato, extremely apt at telling stories in a strong tone (he made the infamous Cannibal Holocaust), and the scriptwriter Fernando di Leo, author of the best Italian noir films (Recently released in a DVD boxed set as The Fernando Di Leo Crime Collection – All four films will be available as individual breakouts on July 14 from RaroVideo). Above all, the psychological and behavioral description of the main characters, the two policemen, members of an anti-crime squad who have complete freedom in their actions against crime, had never been seen before. Not only do they not hesitate to brutally kill the criminals they are hunting down, but Alfredo (Marc Porel) and Antonio (Ray Lovelock) do so while maintaining a cynical and light-hearted attitude even in the most threatening situations.

RaroVideo U.S.’s restored version of Live Like a Cop, Die Like a Man, will arrive on DVD for the first time ever on July 26. The extensive DVD extras include the documentary entitled, Poliziotti Violenti and a fully illustrated booklet containing critical analysis of the film.

LIVE LIKE A COP, DIE LIKE A MAN has been restored through a new digital HD transfer from the original 35mm negative.